The Post is Here

Corona Chronicles IX

Yesterday and today have been pretty okay days. However, Work – Exercise – Relax and not much else so still no creativity. On that point, I downloaded Google Sheets onto my iPad last night. My hope was that I would be able to copy and paste my Excel Camino Story plan onto a G. S. file. If I could do this, I would be able to examine and amend the plan, and think a little more clearly about the story, while relaxing away from my desk.

I was keen to do this because even though I work part time, I am at my desk for a large portion of the day so it would mean a lot to be able to work a little away from it. Happily, the copy and pasting was successful. I need to change the column lengths but once that is done, I’ll be able to get going again with the story.

Over the last two days, I watched The Post while exercising. I rate this film 8/10. In 1971, The New York Times published a secret government report which showed that successive American presidents had lied about their country’s involvement in the Vietnam war. President Nixon successfully applied in court to stop the paper publishing any more documents. The Washington Post, then a failing newspaper, took the case up and published more of the report. The American government took it to court but was defeated. The film is well written and acted – especially by Meryl Streep as Katharine Graham, the owner of the Post and Tom Hanks as its editor, Ben Bradlee – and directed by Steven Spielberg. I have to say, though, for a while, I wasn’t sure what genre the film was supposed to be. It should have been a thriller but didn’t feel quite suspenseful enough. In a strange way, it felt more like a biopic of the paper at a critical moment in America’s history. The last scene of the film, when a security guard discovers the break-in at the Watergate hotel was a great way to end the film. Tomorrow, I am going to start watching Divergence.

I read another chapter of C. S. Lewis’ Reflections on the Psalms today. In this chapter, he looks at the Old Testament attitude towards death. According to Lewis, the Jewish view was not unlike that of, say, the ancient Greeks: there was nothing after death. As he points out, if you know your New Testament, you will know that by the time of Jesus, Jewish views had diverged. Some did believe there was life after death while others still maintained the opposite.

My father did the house shopping today. Tomorrow afternoon I will pop out for mine. I hope it goes as well as last week with everyone observing the two metre rule. I hope I remember to buy everything that I need.

What will happen after the coronavirus fades away? Is globalisation finished? I don’t think it will – we are all just too connected now – be but we surely have lessons to learn about how we respond to medical emergencies like this. Will we do so? I imagine there will be enquiries but I fear lessons will not be learned. I say this because I don’t think we changed anything after the banking crisis just over a decade ago. Democracy just doesn’t encourage long term thinking. Not that I am advocating authoritarian rule: this pandemic spread in part due to the Chinese government covering up what was happening. All in all it is not very encouraging. We just have to hope.

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